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5905 Old Lohman Rd.

Jefferson City, Mo.
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Mon - Fri. 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Saturday & Sunday CLOSED

5905 Old Lohman Rd.

Jefferson City, Mo.
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Mon. - Fri. 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Saturday & Sunday CLOSED

Small Colorful Trees

While some yards are spacious and have ample room for a variety of large trees, others are smaller and more compact. Some homeowners prefer smaller trees in areas close to their homes mixed in with other landscaping. In this month’s blog, we will go over some of the small trees that grow well in zone 5 (the USDA hardiness zone where Mid-Missouri is situated) that will add some beautiful, colorful pops to your landscaping.

Crabapple

There are hundreds of varieties of these fun little trees, with blossoms ranging from white to pink to burgundy and with varying shades of leaves and fruit. Crabapple trees provide visual interest nearly all year long!

If you’re looking for a low-maintenance, long-lived tree, red oak is definitely one to consider. These trees tolerate most well-draining soil types, and will grow best in moist, acidic to neutral soil. Plant red oaks in full sun and give them plenty of space because they will become large landscape trees. These trees can get up to 75 feet tall with a 45 foot spread when mature, so if you have a smaller yard, you may want to consider other tree options.

Southern_Red_Oak_Tree_350_grande

Redbud

These small trees are very common in the Midwest and are well known for their showy display of tiny pink flowers in early spring. Redbuds are relatively easy to grow and maintain and they hold up well to the varying weather conditions that Missouri often presents.

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Crape Myrtle

These small deciduous trees can be considered a tree or a shrub, depending on how they are pruned and maintained. They commonly feature pink paper-like flowers with deep green foliage that turns to various shades of yellow, orange and red in the autumn.

trident maple

Flowering Dogwood

Missouri’s state flower is the dogwood for many reasons, not the least of which is how well these delicate blossomed trees grow here in the show-me state. Coming in several varieties, most have white to light pink flowers and have horizontal branches that naturally grow in tiers. These gorgeous trees are also home to red fruit and scarlet foliage in the fall.

bradford pear tree

Saucer Magnolia

These small but statement-making trees traditionally have low branches with large, stunning saucer shaped flowers and deep, broad, rubbery green leaves and a sliver trunk. Magnolias thrive in moist, deep, acidic soil conditions.

bradford pear tree

Japanese Maple

Known for their vibrant red to purple leaves, these small, delicate trees come in a range of foliage colors that may vary based on variety and climate. They tend to grow well, even when potted. Their dainty form and lacy leaves don’t require pruning and will naturally grow into it’s own unique shape. Often these trees are grafted, so if you notice any branches starting low on the trunk, they should be removed.

bradford pear tree

Always consult with an arborist about your yard’s specific soil makeup and drainage. The arborists at Hentges Tree Service are more than happy to help keep your trees happy and healthy, no matter the variety.

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